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Haimrik PC Review

Haimrik is a 2D Puzzle adventure game staring a young scribe by the name of Haimrik. While in his study under the local tavern, Haimrik discovers a magic book that when written in with his own blood transports him into the book where words come to life! The player follows Haimrik and his motley crew of town friends as he fights Word Warriors with magical tomes of their own, and invade the castle of an oppressive regime. Unfortunately, the first hour or so of the game got tedious at points, not because of the puzzles, but the story that happened between then. The first half of the game presents dull characters who seem only there to fit a trope. As the story continues, the characters you’re introduced to become more interesting and multifaceted, creating as much joy from the story as the gameplay itself.

Haimrik 1

The core mechanic of Haimrik is his magical book. Every mission starts with Haimrik slicing his hand and bleeding on the pages, then awakening in a storybook setting. The story is told out through the ground Haimrik walks on, letting the player know the scene that’s about to play out, as well as give them instruction and help. Haimrik’s ability is to take these words and make them come to life, whether it be pulling a literal sword out of the word or making it rain to put out a fire blocking the player’s path. This mechanic is used to solve puzzles to get to the end of a stage. It’s used in a slew of unique ways, from grabbing a sword to battle enemies, finding the right fertilizer to stop bugs from devouring you for carrying berries, and even helping unlock doors so another character can proceed through the storybook.

I played through Haimrik using an Xbox One controller for Steam; almost every action felt smooth and well-paced. I had no issue during most of the game, as every aspect worked exactly how you would expect, but the one issue I did have with controls appeared in combat. During the few times a player was expected to confront guards in a fair fight, the combat felt sloppy. While this isn’t a huge issue, it caused me to stop the few times this was expected, as I just wasn’t having as much fun with the game during those portions.

Haimrik 2

Haimrik adopts a storybook aesthetic, making everything look like it’s made of paper. The fun of this art style comes when you zoom in the camera during cannon and crossbow battles and see that everything is 2D, but exists in a 3D plane. The art in Haimrik is beautifully drawn with a pleasant style that brings its characters to life in all their glory. Each character has their own expressive style that tells so much about them before they even talk. The worlds Haimrik visits during his journey, while they appear to be the same corridor over and over, the developers did their best to make the corridors reflect where Haimrik is supposed to be in the story it’s telling. Some instances succeed more than others, but it was difficult to find myself bored with any particular setting.

The soundtrack of Haimrik is subtle. It’s not remarkable in any regard, but it sets the mood perfectly whether the player is in a battle with a dragon or walking around town to find materials to subdue a lion. While it won’t get stuck in your head for a long time, it definitely increases the fun during the journey.

Haimrik 3

The biggest downside with Haimrik is that once you’ve experienced the story, there’s not much left to do. There is no end game content, extra missions, nor missions that give you multiple options on how you solve the puzzle. Pressing the continue button after completion of the game will start the game right at the final cutscene. No mission select can be found to replay the best missions and, as far as I could tell, there are no collectables to be found throughout the game.

Haimrik deserves praise for its unique mechanic and how it was used in so many different ways through its story. Despite a slow first half of the game filled with one sided characters, the game really came into its own in the second half. For the price, it’s definitely worth a purchase, and I look forward to seeing what the developer does with this idea in the future.

Summary
Haimrik deserves praise for its unique mechanic and how it was used in so many different ways through its story. Despite a slow first half of the game filled with one sided characters, the game really came into its own in the second half. For the price, it’s definitely worth a purchase, and I look forward to seeing what the developer does with this idea in the future.
Good
  • Unique Concept
  • Fun Story
  • Good Puzzles
Bad
  • Weak First Half
  • No Replayability
6.6
Fair
Gameplay - 8
Graphics - 7
Audio - 7
Replayability - 4
Controls - 7
Written by
I like to go fast and play games. Combining the two is just a bonus.

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